СОЧ Английский язык 9 класс — ТЖБ Ағылшын тілі 9 сынып

Specification of Summative Assessment for term on the subject «The English language» Grade 9

CONTENTS
1. Aim of the Summative Assessment for term……………………………………3
2. The document defining the content of the Summative Assessment for term…………3
3. Expected outcomes on the subject «The English language», Grade 9………………3
4. Level of thinking skills on the subject «The English language», Grade 9………..4
5. Admini strati on rules……………………………………………………5
6. Moderation and marking……………………………………………………5
SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 1…………………………….6
SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 2……………………………19
SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 3……………………………34
SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 4……………………………47
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1. Aim of the Summative Assessment for term
Summative assessment (SA) is aimed to assess learners’ success in terms of the learning objectives achievement and reveal their level of knowledge and skills acquired during the term within the framework of updating the secondary education content.
Specification describes the content and procedure for the delivery of the Summative Assessment for term in «The English language» in Grade 9.
2. The document defining the content of the Summative Assessment for term
The Subject Programme for «The English language» for 5-9 grades of lower secondary education on the updated content.
3. Expected outcomes on the subject «The English language», Grade 9 Listening
A learner understands the main ideas of texts on curricular topics, identifies essential facts distinguishing them from non-essential, understands details within the framework of familiar topics, formulates complex questions based on listening material in order to obtain additional information, deduces the meaning of listening material using context clues, identifies specific information within the framework of familiar topics, recognises inconsistencies in arguments within the framework of familiar topics.
Speaking
A learner conveys the main ideas of a text within the framework of familiar topics logically organising events, uses the formal and informal registers, presents information within the framework of familiar topics, predicts the content of a text using the heading, pictures, key words, extracts within the framework of familiar topics, asks simple and complex questions to obtain specific information, interacts with peers (in a pair, group) to fulfill learning tasks, compares and contrasts texts within the framework of familiar topics, expresses and opinion providing arguments.
Reading
A learner identifies the main ideas of texts and details in texts of a range of styles and genres within the framework of familiar topics, uses a range of information sources (reference materials, dictionaries, the Internet), recognises specific information in a text and a range of styles and genres within the framework of familiar topics, predicts the content of a text using the heading, pictures, key words, extracts, identifies the attitude and opinion of the author, evaluates information from different texts.
Writing
A learner fills in tables, diagrams, schemes, questionnaires, forms, plans, writes, edits and proofreads texts within the framework of familiar topics, makes notes based on a text according to a communicative task, describes real and / or imagined events of the past, present, and future using the knowledge of topics studied before, links and coordinates sentences and paragraphs in a text within the framework of familiar topics, correctly uses punctuation in a text within the framework of familiar topics, creates texts of a range of styles and genres using appropriate rules and layout.
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4. Level of thinking skills on the subject «The English language», Grade 9
Strand Level of thinking skills Description Recommended type of question
Listening Knowledge and comprehension Recognise the main points in unsupported extended talk; identify most specific information in unsupported extended talk; recognise most of the detail of an argument in unsupported extended talk; Questions with multiple choice answers. Questions that require short answer. Questions that require an extended answer.
Higher order thinking skills recognise the opinion of the speaker(s) in unsupported extended talk; deduce meaning from context in unsupported extended talk;
Speaking Application use formal and informal registers in their talk; use appropriate subject-specific vocabulary and syntax in a talk; Questions that require an extended answer.
Higher order thinking skills explain and justify their own point of view; recount extended stories and events;
Reading Knowledge and comprehension recognise the main points in extended texts; identify specific information and detail in texts; recognise the detail of an argument in extended texts; Questions with multiple choice answers. Questions that require short answer. Questions that require an extended answer.
Higher order thinking skills deduce meaning from context in extended texts on a range of familiar general and curricular topics; recognise typical features at word, sentence and text level in a wide range of written genres;
Writing Application write with moderate grammatical accuracy; use with minimal or no support style and register appropriate to a growing variety of written genres; write coherently at text level using a variety of connectors; use independently appropriate layout at text level; spell most high-frequency vocabulary accurately; Questions that require an extended answer.
Higher order thinking skills write independently about factual and imaginary past events, activities and experiences; develop with support coherent arguments supported when necessary by examples and reasons;
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Application use an increased variety of prepositions Questions that
before nouns and adjectives use a growing require short
number of dependent prepositions following answer.
Use of nouns and adjectives and an increased Questions that
English variety of dependent prepositions following require an
verbs; extended answer.
use a variety of future forms, including
some passives.
5. Administration rules
During the Assessment cover all visual materials like, diagram, schemes, posters and maps that can serve as prompts for the learners.
At the beginning of the Assessment read out the instructions and inform the learners about the assessment duration. Remind learners that they are not allowed to talk with each other during the Summative Assessment. After the instructions, make sure they have understood given instructions and ask if they have any questions before the start of the assessment.
Ensure that the learners are working individually and not helping each other. During the Summative Assessment learners should not have any access to additional recourses that can help them, for example, dictionaries (excluding the cases when it is allowed in specification).
Recommend learners to cross the wrong answers instead of using an eraser.
During the assessment you can answer learners’ questions, regarding the instructions and the assessment duration. You should not spell, paraphrase or provide any information that could give the learner an advantage.
Always tell the learners that they have 5 minutes left before the end of the Summative Assessment.
Tell the learners to stop writing and put down their pens/pencils on the desks at the end of the Summative Assessment.
6. Moderation and marking
All teachers use the same version of the mark scheme. During the moderation process it is necessary to check learner sample papers with the marks awarded to ensure there are no deviations from the standardised mark scheme.
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SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 1
Review of summative assessment for term 1 Duration of the summative assessment — 40 minutes
Listening — 10 minutes
Reading — 10 minutes
Writing — 20 minutes
Speaking task is conducted separately.
Total marks — 24 The structure of the summative assessment
This sample of Summative Assessment consists of 14 questions: listening, reading, writing and speaking. Different types of tasks are used in the summative assessment for term.
Listening — matching task on the topics «Hobbies and Qualities», «Exercise and Sport». Reading — matching the information and paragraphs in a short text on the topic «Exercise and Sport».
Writing — writing a newspaper article on the topics «Hobbies and Qualities» and «Exercise and Sport».
Speaking — making an individual speech on the topics «Hobbies and Qualities» and «Exercise and Sport».
Tapescript for listening task can be found in CD3. Transcript can be found after the mark scheme.
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Characteristic of tasks for summative assessment for term 1
*Total
Unit Strand Learning objective number of questions *Question № *Type of question *Task description Time Total marks
Hobbies Listening 9.2.1.1 Understand the 6 1 Matching Task 1- Learners listen to six 10 minutes 6
and main points in 2 short monologues and choose the
Qualities unsupported extended talk on a wide range of 3 4 correct answer from six alternatives.
Exercise general and curricular 5 The tasks enable learners to
and Sport topics 6 identify the main idea of the talks on the topics «Hobbies and Qualities» and «Exercise and Sport». Learners should listen to a recording twice, having a chance to look through the questions before the recording starts.
Reading 9.4.1.1 Understand the main points in extended texts on a range of unfamiliar general and curricular topics 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 Matching Learners read a text on the topic «Exercise and Sport». Task 1 incorporates 2 questions where learners match the paragraphs with the information. Task 2 is matching the headings with the paragraphs. This task enables learners to identify the main idea in the text. The task consists of 4sentences. 10 minutes 6
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Writing 9.5.2.1 Write independently about factual and imaginary past events, activities and experiences on a range of familiar general and curricular topics 9.5.3.1 Write with moderate grammatical accuracy on a wide range of familiar general and curricular topics 1 1 Writing an article Learners write a newspaper article. Learners should write a text keeping the layout and format of a given genre according to the given questions, writing about real events connecting them into paragraphs and applying grammar accurately. Learners should choose one of the tasks on the topics «Hobbies and Qualities» and «Exercise and Sport». 20 minutes 6
Speaking 9.3.1.1 Use formal and informal registers in their talk on a range of general and curricular topics 9.6.14.1 Use an increased variety of prepositions before nouns and adjectives use a growing number of dependent prepositions following nouns and adjectives and an increased variety of dependent prepositions following verbs on a range of familiar general and curricular topics 1 1 Monologue Learners talk individually on the topics «Hobbies and Qualities» and «Exercise and Sport». Learners prepare individual speech on the given topic expressing their opinion, using stories from the previous learning or real life experience and applying a variety of grammar accurately. Learners should prepare for 1 minute and talk 2-3 minutes. Teacher can ask supporting questions if necessary to help learners. 3-4 minutes 6
TOTAL: 40 minutes (excluding speaking) 24
Note: * — sections that can be changed
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Sample questions and mark scheme Tasks for the Summative Assessment for Term 1
LISTENING
Task. Listen to the dialogues. Six people talk about sport they like. Match each speaker with his or her reason, A-F.
CD3 Tapescriptl.
1. Speaker 1 A) There are friendly people who go there, so it’s a good place to meet people. [1]
2. Speaker 2 B) It’s a great way to keep fit. It’s better than going to a health club. [1]
3. Speaker 3 C) There’s hardly anyone there and you can listen to the ocean as you do it. [1]
4. Speaker 4 D) It’s a good exercise because you have to walk a lot. [1]
5. Speaker 5 E) It’s really fun! But, it’s not as easy as it looks. [1]
6. Speaker 6 F) I have no trouble to finding somewhere to play. [1]
Total [6]
READING
Task. Read the text and identify in which paragraph (A-D) the writer does these things.
1. Establishes the emotional importance of baseball for fans.________________________________Paragraph_______________________[1]
2. The origins of baseball. Paragraph_________[ 1]
TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALLPARK
A. Baseball is a much-loved national sport in USA. It’s also popular in the countries of South America and Japan. Europe is another matter. Not many baseball teams exist in Europe today. It is slowly changing. Since baseball is an Olympic sport, lots of countries are joining the game!
B. Going to baseball games is a way of life for many fans. They sit in the stands on hot and sunny spring and summer days, eat hot dogs or popcorn, sip cola or lemonade and enjoy the game. Adults and children alike attend games, and it’s a sport that everyone seems to love. Baseball is such a part of American life that nearly everyone’s favourite childhood memory includes a day at the ballpark.
C. Modern baseball began about 150 years ago in New York, USA and has been popular sport ever since. It has changed a little bit over the years but the basic game remains the same. Baseball is played with a bat, which is a stick of about 100 cm long, made of metal or wood, and a small hard ball. Each player wears one heavy leather glove to catch the ball. Baseball is played on a special outdoor field.
D. The game of baseball is divided into nine parts, called innings. During an inning, each of the two teams takes its turn to bat, which means trying to hit the ball that is thrown to them by the pitcher of other team. After the ball is hit, the player tries to run and touch three different bases before running to the home base. The team that is not batting tries to catch the balls that are hit, and stop the runners before they score. The team that scores the most runs by the end of the ninth inning wins.
Task. Match the headings 3-6 with the paragraphs A-D.
3. The rules of playing the game [1]
4. The facilities [1]
5. The changes happening to baseball ______________________________________________________________________ [1]
6. Part of people’s life [1]
Total [6]
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WRITING
Choose ONE of the topics and write.
Topic 1. Write an article to a newspaper describing the most popular hobby in Kazakhstan nowadays using appropriate grammar. Try to mention these questions:
1. What kind of hobby is very popular among younger generation in Kazakhstan?
2. Why is it important?
3. Is your own hobby different from the most popular one? How? Why?
Topic 2. Write an article to a newspaper describing the recent Sport Olympiad where Kazakhstan sportsmen participated (in country or abroad) using appropriate grammar. Try to mention these questions:
1. What is the Olympiad’s focus?
2. How did our sportsmen perform?
3. Why is it important to participate in such events?
Total [6]
SPEAKING
Task. You are given quetsions to speak about for 2-3 minutes. Before you speak you have one minute to think about what you are going to say and you can make notes if you wish.
Card 1
1. What kind of indoor games can you recommend to your friend?
2. How can it influence him/her?
3. Are there any types of sport that you watch but do not play? Which? Why?
4. Which game or sport is the most popular in your country? Why?
Card 2
1. Should people choose a hobby according to their personality? Why?
2. What kind of outdoor activity can you recommend to a self-confident person?
3. How can it influence him/her?
4. How much time should be spent on this hobby? Why?
Card 3
1. What kind of team games can you recommend to a shy person?
2. How can it help him/her?
3. What are the advantages of team games?
4. Why is team work important in everyday life?
Card 4
1. What types of outside hobbies do you enjoy?
2. Would you recommend it to your friends? Why?
3. Do children tend to spend most of their time outdoor? Why?
4. Will children’s hobbies change in the future? What are the reasons?
Card 5
1. What hobbies are popular among teenagers?
2. Are there any new hobbies that you would like to take up? Why?/Why not?
3. Which hobby seems unusual to you?
4. Do you think a hobby is different from a sport? Why?/Why not?
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Card 6
1.
2.
3.
4.
Card 7
1.
2.
3.
4.
Card 8
1.
2.
3.
4.
Describe a quality or skill you have.
How has it changed over the years?
Can it help you to be successful? How?
What other characteristics would you like to develop in the future?
How would you describe your personality?
Is your true personality always on show or do you hide?
Do all your family members have similar personalities? What are they?
What are the personality differences between you and other family members?
What extreme sports do you know?
Why do you think people like risky sports?
Have you ever practised any extreme sport? What are they?
What type of extreme sport would you like to try in the future? Why?
Total [6] Total marks /24
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Mark scheme
Listening and R eading
Question № Answer Mark Additional information
Listening
1 A 1
2 C 1
3 F 1
4 E 1
5 B 1
6 D 1
Reading
1 B 1
2 C 1
3 D 1
4 C 1
5 A 1
6 B 1
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Mark scheme Writing and Speaking
CRITERIA FOR MARKING WRITING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (content, organisation, vocabulary, and grammar and punctuation), and then calculate a mean to give an overall ^ total out of 6. All fractional marks should be rounded up to the closest whole mark.______________________________________________________
Mark / Criterion Content (relevance and development of ideas Organisation (cohesion, paragraphing, and format) Vocabulary (style and accuracy) Grammar (style and accuracy) and Punctuation (accuracy)
6 • All content is relevant to the task. • The register completely corresponds to the requirements of the task; consistent and intentional misuse of register* may indicate a writer’s personal style. • All content points are fully addressed and developed in a balanced way. *Such misuse of register should not harm the format of writing. • Uses a wide range of connectors accurately; referencing is mostly clear. • Uses paragraphs to separate ideas; all paragraphs revolve around one idea or a set of like ideas; the size of each paragraph allows for a proper and balanced development of ideas. • The format is appropriate, but may be modified for a better reading experience. • Uses a range of everyday vocabulary appropriately; attempts to use less common lexical items with occasional inappropriacies. • Has good control of word formation; may make occasional errors in producing less common word forms. • Spells common vocabulary items correctly; very few (one or two) occasional spelling mistakes may be present. • May occasionally misspell less common lexical items. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling do not distort meaning. • Writes simple and compound sentence forms correctly and demonstrates some variety in length. • Attempts some complex sentences, but they tend to be less accurate, including punctuation. • Errors in grammar and/or punctuation do not distort meaning.
5 • All content is relevant to the task; insignificant content omissions may be present. • The register on the whole corresponds to the requirements of the task; occasional and inconsistent misuse of register may be present. • Uses a range of basic connectors accurately and attempts to use more advanced connectors, but not always accurately, and referencing, but not always clearly or appropriately. • Uses paragraphs to separate ideas; most paragraphs • Uses a range of everyday vocabulary appropriately; attempts to use less common lexical items, but may make frequent errors. • Has good control of word formation; may make errors in producing less common word forms. • Writes simple and compound sentence forms correctly, but does not demonstrate variety in length. • Occasional errors in grammar and/or punctuation do not distort meaning.
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• Most content points are addressed, but their development may be slightly imbalanced. revolve around one idea or a set of like ideas; the size of each paragraph may reflect imbalanced development of ideas. • The format is appropriate. • Spells common vocabulary items correctly; few (no more than five) occasional spelling mistakes may be present. • May often misspell less common lexical items. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling do not distort meaning.
4 • Most content is relevant to the task; insignificant content omissions may be present. • The register on the whole corresponds to the requirements of the task. • Most content points are addressed, but some content points may be more fully covered than others. • Uses a range of basic connectors accurately. • Uses paragraphs to separate ideas, but tends to misuse paragraphing (a script is a set of very short paragraphs or some paragraphs may be much longer than other ones for no apparent reason). • The format is generally appropriate. • Uses everyday vocabulary generally appropriately, while occasionally overusing certain lexical items. • Has good control of word formation; can produce common word forms correctly. • May make infrequent errors in spelling more difficult words. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling rarely distort meaning. • Writes simple and some compound sentence forms correctly. • While errors in grammar and/or punctuation are noticeable, meaning is rarely distorted.
3 • Some content is relevant to the task; significant content omissions may be present. • The register barely corresponds to the requirements of the task. • Only some content points, which are minimally addressed. • Uses some basic connectors, but these may be inaccurate or repetitive. • Writes in paragraphs, but may not use them to separate ideas (a script may have random breaks between paragraphs). • The format may be inappropriate in places. • Uses basic vocabulary reasonably appropriately. • Has some control of word formation; can produce some common word forms correctly. • Makes frequent errors in spelling more difficult words, but simple words are spelled correctly. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling distort meaning at • Writes simple sentence forms mostly correctly. • Errors in grammar and/or punctuation may distort meaning at times.
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times.
2 • Severe irrelevances and misinterpretations of the task may be present. • Only few content points, which are minimally addressed. • May use a very limited range of basic cohesive devices, and those used may not indicate a logical relationship between ideas. • Attempts to write in paragraphs, but their use may be confusing (may start every sentence with a new line). • The format may be inappropriate. • Uses an extremely limited range of vocabulary. • Has very limited control of word formation; can produce a few common word forms correctly. • Makes many errors in spelling, including a range of simple words. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling distort meaning. • Writes some simple sentence forms correctly. • Frequent errors in grammar and/or punctuation distort meaning.
1 • Attempts the task, but it is largely misinterpreted and the response is barely relevant to the task. • Links are missing or incorrect. • Does not write in paragraphs at all (a script is a block of text). • The format is not appropriate. • Can only use a few isolated words and/or memorised phrases. • Has essentially no control of word formation; can barely produce any word forms. • Displays few examples of conventional spelling. • No evidence of sentence forms.
0 • Does not attempt the task in any way. OR • The response is completely irrelevant to the task. OR • There is too little language to assess. OR • Content is completely incomprehensible due to extremely poor handwriting: very few words are distinguishable, so there is a lack of context to verify meaning.
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CRITERIA FOR MARKING SPEAKING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (development and fluency, and language), and then calculate a mean to give an overall total out of 6.
Mark / Criterion Development and Fluency Language
6 • Produces stretches of language in a register which is appropriate to the situation provided in the task and may opt to vary register to enhance meaning. • Shows sustained ability to maintain a conversation and to make relevant contributions at some length. • Produces extended stretches of language despite some hesitation. • Can respond to change in direction of the conversation. • Pronunciation is intelligible*. • Intonation is appropriate. • Produces error-free simple sentences. • Attempts some complex grammatical forms, but may make errors, which rarely cause comprehension problems. • Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary to give and exchange views on a growing range of general and curricular topics.
5 • Produces stretches of language in a register which is appropriate to the situation provided in the task. • Responds relevantly and at length which makes frequent prompting unnecessary, resulting in a competent conversation. • Produces mostly extended stretches of language despite some hesitation, although instances of using short phrases may be present. • Can generally respond to change in direction of the conversation. • Pronunciation is generally intelligible. • Intonation is generally appropriate • Produces error-free simple sentences. • Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary when talking about a range of general and curricular topics. • Occasional mistakes do not cause comprehension problems.
4 • Produces stretches of language in a register which is generally appropriate to the situation provided in the task. • Attempts to respond to questions and prompts. • Produces responses which are extended beyond short phrases, despite hesitation. • Effort will need to be made to develop the conversation; only partial success will be achieved. • Pronunciation is mostly intelligible. • May not follow English intonation patterns at times. • Frequently produces error-free simple sentences. • Uses appropriate vocabulary to talk about a limited range of general and curricular topics. • Errors may cause comprehension problems.
3 • Produces stretches of language without awareness of register. • Produces basic sentence forms and some correct simple
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• Responses tend to be brief and are characterised by frequent hesitation. • Has to be encouraged to go beyond short responses and struggles to develop a conversation. • There is a lack of intelligibility of pronunciation, but it is unlikely to impede communication. • May not follow English intonation patterns frequently. sentences. • Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a limited range of general topics. • Errors are frequent and may lead to misunderstanding.
2 • Responses are so brief that little is communicated. • Barely engages in a conversation. • Pronunciation may cause some communication difficulty. • Does not follow English intonation patterns. • Attempts basic sentence forms, but with limited success. OR • Heavily relies on apparently memorised utterances. • Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a very limited range of general topics. • Makes numerous errors except in memorised expressions.
1 • No communication possible. • Pronunciation and intonation patterns cause difficulty for even the most sympathetic listener. • Cannot produce basic sentence forms. • Can only produce isolated words and phrases or memorised utterances.
0 • No attempt at the response. OR • No rateable language.
*Speech deficiencies should not be considered as affecting intelligibility.
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Transcript
Speaker 1 (a girl):
I used to lift weights, but I didn’t really enjoy it. So that’s when I started swimming. Now I do it about twice a week. It’s much more fun. I go to a nice pool near my office. It’s never too crowded, which is great. There are friendly people who go there, so it’s a good place to meet people.
Speaker 2 (a boy):
I go out every morning. It’s great way to start the day. It’s more interesting than exercising at home like I used to. That was really boring. I go to a beach near my house. It’s lovely in the early morning. There’s hardly anyone there and you can listen to the ocean as you do it.
Speaker 3 (a girl):
I used to play both tennis and volleyball. But I play mainly volleyball now. I think it’s a lot more fun. I thought tennis was tiring. It was also difficult to find a partner, and the courts were always crowded, too. With volleyball, I have no trouble finding somewhere to play.
Speaker 4 (a girl):
I used to take long walks every day, but it got boring, I wanted something more exciting, so that’s when I took up rollerblading. It’s really fun! But, it’s not as easy as it looks. It took me a long time to learn how to do it. I fell a lot at the beginning. The great thing is you can do it almost anywhere. My friends think I’m kind of strange because none of them do it, but I love it.
Speaker 5 (a boy):
I finally bought myself a bicycle. It’s a great way to keep fit. I think it’s better than going to a health club. It took me a long time to learn to ride it in traffic. I nearly fell off a couple of tmes. I don’t often go on busy streets because that can be dangerous, but there are plenty of places where I can ride near where I live. I use it to get to work sometimes, but only if the weather is nice.
Speaker 6 (a girl):
I used to go to aerobics class, but I found it pretty silly — all that jumping around. So that’s when I decided to take golf lessons. It can be pretty expensive because you have to buy all your equipment and club fees are high. People think it’s very easy, but it’s not. It’s also good exercise because you have to walk a lot.
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SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 2
Review of summative assessment for term 2 Duration of the summative assessment — 40 minutes
Listening — 10 minutes
Reading — 10 minutes
Writing — 20 minutes
Speaking task is conducted separately.
Total marks — 24
The structure of the summative assessment
This sample of Summative Assessment consists of 14 questions: listening, reading, writing and speaking. Different types of tasks are used in the Summative Assessment for term.
Listening — choosing options and multiple-choice tasks on the topic «Earth and our place in
it».
Reading — matching task on the topic «Charities and Conflict».
Writing — writing a letter on the topics «Earth and our place in it» and «Charities and Conflict».
Speaking — making a monologue on the topics «Earth and our place in it» and «Charities and Conflict».
Tapescript for listening task can be found in CD3. Transcript can be found after the mark scheme.
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Characteristic of tasks for summative assessment for term 2
*Total
Unit Strand Learning objective number of questions *Question № *Type of question *Task description Time Total marks
Earth and Listening 9.2.2.1 Understand 6 1 Multiple- Task 1- Learners listen to an 10 minutes 6
our place in most specific 2 choice extended talk on the topic «Earth
it information in unsupported extended 3 4 and our place in it». They should identify main idea in extended
Charities talk on a wide range of 5 talk and choose three answers
and Conflict general and curricular topics 6 from given options. Task 1 incorporates a question and five options, three of them are correct answers to be chosen. Task 2- Learners listen to the same recording and finish the sentences by choosing the correct answer. The task enables learners to identify the detailed arguments from the recording. Task 2 incorporates three multiple — choice questions. Learners should listen to a recording twice for each task, having chance to look through the questions before the recording starts.
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Reading 9.4.2.1 Understand specific information and detail in texts on a range of familiar general and curricular topics, including some extended texts 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 Matching Learners read an extended text on the topic «Charities and Conflict» and match the words with their synonyms. This task enables learners to identify the meaning of the words. Task 2 is matching halves of the sentences. This task enables learners to recognise details in a given argument. The task consists of 3 sentences. There are two extra options that are not necessary to use. 10 minutes 6
Writing 9.5.4.1 Use with minimal or no support style and register appropriate to a growing variety of written genres on general and curricular topics 9.5.5.1 Develop with support coherent arguments supported when necessary by examples and reasons for a range of written genres in familiar general and curricular topics 1 1 Open ended Writing a formal letter Learners write a formal letter according to the given questions. They should write about real and imaginary past events connecting them into paragraphs, keeping appropriate format and plan of a given genre and following the criteria, applying grammatically correct sentences. Learners should choose one task on the topics «Earth and our place in it» and «Charities and Conflict». 20 minutes 6
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Speaking 9.3.3.1 Explain and justify their own point of view on a range of general and curricular topics 1 1 Open — ended Monologu Learners talk individually on the topics «Earth and our place in it» e and «Charities and Conflict». Learners choose a card and prepare an individual speech providing unprepared speech to answer a variety of questions and applying a variety of grammar accurately. Learners should prepare for 1 minute and talk 2-3 minutes. Teacher can ask supporting questions if necessary to help learners. 3-4 minutes 6
TOTAL: 40 minutes (excluding speaking) 24
Note: * — sections that can be changed
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Sample questions and mark scheme Tasks for the Summative Assessment for term 2
LISTENING
Task. Listen to the dialogue. What advantages of global warming does Josh mention? Choose THREE answers from A — E.
CD3 Tapescript2
A. People can swim throughout the whole year.
B. Some cities away from the beach will become summer resorts.
C. People will need to buy lifesaving items.
D. People will not use cars any more.
E. People save money on purchasing heavy items of clothing.
Task. Listen again and choose the correct answer.
4. According to the scientists global warming … [1]
A. will cause natural disasters
B. will lead to flooding
C. will be the reason of low temperature
D. will be the reason of saving money
5. Richard tells Josh that he will be able to swim in his back garden because … [1]
A. people will have enough supplied water to make swimming pools.
B. temperature keeps rising that means water in the swimming pool will be warm.
C. that a lot of cities will also flood along with the one they both live in.
D. he would not need to go to the sea to swim there.
6. Josh says petrol would be affordable because … [1]
A. people would drive their cars more.
B. there would be no hinders in the Arctic.
C. polar bears would not live in the Arctic anymore.
D. people could go for nice long drives in the countryside.
Hollywood stars are beautiful, talented and generous, too. In fact most stars do some work for charity. Today lots of celebrities, like Angelina Jolie, George Clooney, and Scarlett Johansson do charity work.
In Hollywood it is fashionable to be concerned about the world and the environment. But can actors succeed where politicians failed? Well, some are succeeding very well! When a charity is connected to a star, it gets publicity. People become interested and want to help: Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt are often in the news because of their work for charity. In 2006 when Jolie was expecting her baby, she let ‘People magazine’ print photos in exchange for a donation to a charity in Haiti.
1. Advantage 1
2. Advantage 2
3. Advantage 3
[1]
[1]
[1]
Total [6]
READING
STARS WANT TO SAVE THE WORLD
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‘We cannot ignore the fact that millions of people are suffering. I want to help’, says Jolie. Here are some celebriies who are trying to make the world a better place.
Di Caprio is a determined environmentalist. In 2007, he made a documentary 11th hour, about the environment crisis caused by human actions. He flies in commercial planes and not private jets which use more fuel. He thinks that global warming is the biggest problem for humanity.
George Clooney, Matt Damon and Brad Pitt raise 5 million dollars for Darfur crisis during the premiere of Ocean’s thirteen at the Cannes Festival. Now, Clooney wants every film festival to be a charity event. After Matt Damon saw extreme poverty in Zambia and South Africa, he wanted to help other parts of Africa, too. He made a documentary called Running the Sahara to get support for clean water programs in Africa.
In 2001 Scarlett Johansson didn’t go to the Oscars: she preferred to tour India and Sri Lanka for the charity Oxfam. ‘It is strange to come home when you see people living in poverty’, she says, ‘It’s strange to be famous, but this means I can help a lot of people’.
Task. Complete the sentences using the words from the text. Write only ONE word.
1. The celebrities are considered not only attractive and gifted but also__________________________________. [1]
2. In Hollywood some celebrities are worried about the world and the . [1]
3. Some celebrities allow to print their photos in the magazines to make a . [1]
Task. Match the sentences (4-6) with the halves (A-E) to make true sentences. There are TWO EXTRA options.
4. Leonardo di Caprio doesn’t use private jets because … [1]
5. Matt Damon made a documentary “Running the Sahara” because … [1]
6. Scarlett Johansson didn’t go to the Oscars in 2007 because … [1]
A. this person found it more useful to travel rather than attending academy awards.
B. this person refused comforts to be environmentally friendly.
C. this person used a family member to make others to donate money.
D. this person wanted to organise charity event.
E. this person wanted to help needy countries .
Total [6] WRITING Choose ONE of the topics and write.
Topic 1: You are a charitable volunteer in your city and always give a hand to those who are in need: clean the apartments of the disabled people; bring food to animal refuges to feed homeless animals; organise campaigns to raise money and collect toys and clothes for the local orphanages. Your new idea is to write a formal letter to the local mayor to ask him/her for any help he/she can provide to help your charity organisation. Include in your letter the following information:
• The title of your charity organisation;
• What you have done/are doing already;
• How you would like the mayor to help your charity organisation.
Use appropriate style and examples in your letter.
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Topic 2: You are working in an organisation that protects the environment in your country: clean the streets; preserve national reservations; organise campaigns to raise money to preserve endangered animals (e.g., Saiga, snow leopard, flamingo, etc.)
Your new idea is to write a formal letter to the local mayor to ask him/her for any help he/she can provide to help your organisation. Include in your letter the following information:
• The current environmental problems;
• What your suggestions are for solving this problem;
• How you would like the mayor to help you / your organisation.
Use appropriate style and examples in your letter.
Total [6] SPEAKING
Task. You are given a card with a topic and questions to speak about for 2-3 minutes. Before you speak you have one minute to think about what you are going to say and you can make notes if you wish.
Card 1 — «Earth and our place in it»
1. What comes to mind when you hear the word ‘pollution’?
2. Who do you think is more responsible for pollution, individual people or the government?
3. What do you as an individual do to prevent it?
4. If you could choose one alternative energy source to develop which one would you choose? Why?
Card 2 — «Earth and our place in it»
1. What are some things that can be recycled?
2. What are some things that your community is doing to help the environment?
3. What are some ways that you can reduce pollution in your country?
4. Do you think global warming is an effect of pollution?
Card 3 — «Charities and Conflict»
1. What types of charities do you think are doing the best and most effective work in the world?
2. What do you think about giving money to homeless people or beggars?
3. Do you think it is better to give time or money?
4. Do you think countries should help the poor in their own country before sending aid to other countries? Why?
Card 4 — «Charities and Conflict»
1. What do you think are some important charities people should give to?
2. Do you think people should give money to homeless people?
3. Should rich people and corporations be forced to give to charity?
4. What benefits can you get by volunteering?
Card 5 — «Earth and our place in it»
1. What are climate change and global warming, and how are they related?
2. What do you do in your daily life that might increase global warming?
3. What could you do to reduce the effect of your actions?
4. How do you think global warming will change the world over the next century?
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Card 6 — «Charities and Conflict»
1. Are there any charity events that your school holds?
2. What kind of charity events would you organise?
3. Do you think that one day there will be no need for charities?
4. Do you agree with the expression “charity begins at home”?
Card 7 — «Earth and our place in it»
1. What makes environmental problems?
2. What are some of the environmental problems that are affecting countries these days?
3. What are some problems that negatively affect animals?
4. What do you consider to be the world’s worst environmental disaster caused by humans?
Card 8 — «Earth and our place in it»
1. What is climate change?
2. What is the evidence of global warming?
3. How will the weather change?
4. What is the international community doing?
Total [6] Total marks /24
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Mark scheme Listening and Reading
Question № Answer Mark Additional information
Listening
1 A 1
2 B 1 In any order
3 E 1
4 B 1
5 C 1
6 B 1
Reading
1 Generous 1
2 Environment 1
3 Donation 1
4 B 1
5 E 1
6 A 1
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Mark scheme Writing and Speaking
CRITERIA FOR MARKING WRITING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (content, organisation, vocabulary, and grammar and punctuation), and then calculate a mean to give an overall ^ total out of 6. All fractional marks should be rounded up to the closest whole mark.______________________________________________________
Mark / Criterion Content (relevance and development of ideas Organisation (cohesion, paragraphing, and format) Vocabulary (style and accuracy) Grammar (style and accuracy) and Punctuation (accuracy)
6 • All content is relevant to the task. • The register completely corresponds to the requirements of the task; consistent and intentional misuse of register* may indicate a writer’s personal style. • All content points are fully addressed and developed in a balanced way. *Such misuse of register should not harm the format of writing. • Uses a wide range of connectors accurately; referencing is mostly clear. • Uses paragraphs to separate ideas; all paragraphs revolve around one idea or a set of like ideas; the size of each paragraph allows for a proper and balanced development of ideas. • The format is appropriate, but may be modified for a better reading experience. • Uses a range of everyday vocabulary appropriately; attempts to use less common lexical items with occasional inappropriacies. • Has good control of word formation; may make occasional errors in producing less common word forms. • Spells common vocabulary items correctly; very few (one or two) occasional spelling mistakes may be present. • May occasionally misspell less common lexical items. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling do not distort meaning. • Writes simple and compound sentence forms correctly and demonstrates some variety in length. • Attempts some complex sentences, but they tend to be less accurate, including punctuation. • Errors in grammar and/or punctuation do not distort meaning.
5 • All content is relevant to the task; insignificant content omissions may be present. • The register on the whole corresponds to the requirements of the task; occasional and inconsistent misuse of register may be present. • Uses a range of basic connectors accurately and attempts to use more advanced connectors, but not always accurately, and referencing, but not always clearly or appropriately. • Uses paragraphs to separate ideas; most paragraphs • Uses a range of everyday vocabulary appropriately; attempts to use less common lexical items, but may make frequent errors. • Has good control of word formation; may make errors in producing less common word forms. • Writes simple and compound sentence forms correctly, but does not demonstrate variety in length. • Occasional errors in grammar and/or punctuation do not distort meaning.
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• Most content points are addressed, but their development may be slightly imbalanced. revolve around one idea or a set of like ideas; the size of each paragraph may reflect imbalanced development of ideas. • The format is appropriate. • Spells common vocabulary items correctly; few (no more than five) occasional spelling mistakes may be present. • May often misspell less common lexical items. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling do not distort meaning.
4 • Most content is relevant to the task; insignificant content omissions may be present. • The register on the whole corresponds to the requirements of the task. • Most content points are addressed, but some content points may be more fully covered than others. • Uses a range of basic connectors accurately. • Uses paragraphs to separate ideas, but tends to misuse paragraphing (a script is a set of very short paragraphs or some paragraphs may be much longer than other ones for no apparent reason). • The format is generally appropriate. • Uses everyday vocabulary generally appropriately, while occasionally overusing certain lexical items. • Has good control of word formation; can produce common word forms correctly. • May make infrequent errors in spelling more difficult words. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling rarely distort meaning. • Writes simple and some compound sentence forms correctly. • While errors in grammar and/or punctuation are noticeable, meaning is rarely distorted.
3 • Some content is relevant to the task; significant content omissions may be present. • The register barely corresponds to the requirements of the task. • Only some content points, which are minimally addressed. • Uses some basic connectors, but these may be inaccurate or repetitive. • Writes in paragraphs, but may not use them to separate ideas (a script may have random breaks between paragraphs). • The format may be inappropriate in places. • Uses basic vocabulary reasonably appropriately. • Has some control of word formation; can produce some common word forms correctly. • Makes frequent errors in spelling more difficult words, but simple words are spelled correctly. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling distort meaning at • Writes simple sentence forms mostly correctly. • Errors in grammar and/or punctuation may distort meaning at times.
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times.
2 • Severe irrelevances and misinterpretations of the task may be present. • Only few content points, which are minimally addressed. • May use a very limited range of basic cohesive devices, and those used may not indicate a logical relationship between ideas. • Attempts to write in paragraphs, but their use may be confusing (may start every sentence with a new line). • The format may be inappropriate. • Uses an extremely limited range of vocabulary. • Has very limited control of word formation; can produce a few common word forms correctly. • Makes many errors in spelling, including a range of simple words. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling distort meaning. • Writes some simple sentence forms correctly. • Frequent errors in grammar and/or punctuation distort meaning.
1 • Attempts the task, but it is largely misinterpreted and the response is barely relevant to the task. • Links are missing or incorrect. • Does not write in paragraphs at all (a script is a block of text). • The format is not appropriate. • Can only use a few isolated words and/or memorised phrases. • Has essentially no control of word formation; can barely produce any word forms. • Displays few examples of conventional spelling. • No evidence of sentence forms.
0 • Does not attempt the task in any way. OR • The response is completely irrelevant to the task. OR • There is too little language to assess. OR • Content is completely incomprehensible due to extremely poor handwriting: very few words are distinguishable, so there is a lack of context to verify meaning.
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CRITERIA FOR MARKING SPEAKING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (development and fluency, and language), and then calculate a mean to give an overall total out of 6.
Mark / Criterion Development and Fluency Language
6 • Produces stretches of language in a register which is appropriate to the situation provided in the task and may opt to vary register to enhance meaning. • Shows sustained ability to maintain a conversation and to make relevant contributions at some length. • Produces extended stretches of language despite some hesitation. • Can respond to change in direction of the conversation. • Pronunciation is intelligible*. • Intonation is appropriate. • Produces error-free simple sentences. • Attempts some complex grammatical forms, but may make errors, which rarely cause comprehension problems. • Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary to give and exchange views on a growing range of general and curricular topics.
5 • Produces stretches of language in a register which is appropriate to the situation provided in the task. • Responds relevantly and at length which makes frequent prompting unnecessary, resulting in a competent conversation. • Produces mostly extended stretches of language despite some hesitation, although instances of using short phrases may be present. • Can generally respond to change in direction of the conversation. • Pronunciation is generally intelligible. • Intonation is generally appropriate • Produces error-free simple sentences. • Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary when talking about a range of general and curricular topics. • Occasional mistakes do not cause comprehension problems.
4 • Produces stretches of language in a register which is generally appropriate to the situation provided in the task. • Attempts to respond to questions and prompts. • Produces responses which are extended beyond short phrases, despite hesitation. • Effort will need to be made to develop the conversation; only partial success will be achieved. • Pronunciation is mostly intelligible. • May not follow English intonation patterns at times. • Frequently produces error-free simple sentences. • Uses appropriate vocabulary to talk about a limited range of general and curricular topics. • Errors may cause comprehension problems.
3 • Produces stretches of language without awareness of register. • Produces basic sentence forms and some correct simple
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• Responses tend to be brief and are characterised by frequent hesitation. • Has to be encouraged to go beyond short responses and struggles to develop a conversation. • There is a lack of intelligibility of pronunciation, but it is unlikely to impede communication. • May not follow English intonation patterns frequently. sentences. • Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a limited range of general topics. • Errors are frequent and may lead to misunderstanding.
2 • Responses are so brief that little is communicated. • Barely engages in a conversation. • Pronunciation may cause some communication difficulty. • Does not follow English intonation patterns. • Attempts basic sentence forms, but with limited success. OR • Heavily relies on apparently memorised utterances. • Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a very limited range of general topics. • Makes numerous errors except in memorised expressions.
1 • No communication possible. • Pronunciation and intonation patterns cause difficulty for even the most sympathetic listener. • Cannot produce basic sentence forms. • Can only produce isolated words and phrases or memorised utterances.
0 • No attempt at the response. OR • No rateable language.
*Speech deficiencies should not be considered as affecting intelligibility.
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Transcript
Josh: You know, I don’t see what the fuss is all about. Personally, I hate cold weather. Global warming means I can go swimming all year round, so for all I care let it get warmer and warmer. Richard: Are you totally insane, Josh? Haven’t you understood a word of what scientists have been saying? If the temperature keeps rising, the polar ice caps will melt. As a result, sea levels will rise causing massive flooding. And, yes, you will be able to go swimming all year round — in your back garden!
Josh: Nonsense! So what? Some towns that are miles away from the sea will become beach resorts. Isn’t that wonderful? You see, your problem is that you keep focusing on disadvantages. If you weren’t so negative, you would be able to see all the advantages of global warming.
Richard: What advantages?
Josh: Well, for starters, if the weather gets even warmer, we will save a lot of money on winter clothes. No more hats, boots and heavy coats. I could wear my T-shirts every day and show off my big muscles!
Richard: Don’t you understand that people who live in southern regions would suffer from extreme heat?
Josh: I don’t see what the big deal is. If it gets too hot for people living in the South, they will simply go to the North to cool off. I mean, we’ve been going to South for years to get warm. Richard: Yes but .
Josh: Don’t interrupt me. Now if polar ice caps were smaller in size, it would be easier to dig for oil in the Arctic, which would mean cheaper petrol for us. Think about how much more often we could use our cars! We could go for nice long drives in the countryside!
Richard: I give up! Josh, you are a hopeless case!
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SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 3
Review of summative assessment for term 3 Duration of the summative assessment — 40 minutes
Listening — 10 minutes
Reading — 10 minuets
Writing — 20 minutes
Speaking task is conducted separately.
Total marks — 24
The structure of the summative assessment
This sample of Summative Assessment consists of 14 questions: listening, reading, writing and speaking. Different types of tasks are used in the Summative Assessment for term.
Listening — matching and multiple choice question on the topic «Traditions and Language».
Reading — paraphrasing and open ended questions on the topic «Music and Film».
Writing — writing a story on the topics «Traditions and Language» and «Music and Film».
Speaking — producing a speech (monologue) on the topics «Reading for pleasure», «Music and Film» and «Traditions and Language».
Tapescript for listening task can be found in CD3. Transcript can be found after the mark scheme.
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Characteristic of tasks for summative assessment for term 3
*Total
Unit Strand Learning objective number of questions *Question № *Type of question *Task description Time Total marks
Reading for Listening 9.2.5.1 Recognise the 6 1 Matching Task 1- Learners listen to an 10 minutes 6
pleasure opinion of the speaker(s) in 2 3 extended conversation and match the speakers with their opinions.
Traditions unsupported extended 4 Multiple Task 2 — Learners choose the
and talk on a wide range of 5 choice correct option.
Language. general and curriculur topics 6 question The tasks enable learners to identify the opinion that speakers
Music and provide while speaking.
Film Learners should listen to a recording twice for each task, having chance to look through the questions before the recording starts.
Reading 9.4.3.1 Understand the detail of an argument in extended texts on a range of familiar general and curricular topics 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 Paraphras ing Open ended questions Learners read an extended text on the topic «Music and Film» Task 1 — Learners paraphrase the given sentences so it has similar meaning. The beginnings of sentences are given. Task 2 — Learners answer two questions. These tasks enable learners to identify details of the argument according to the text. 10 minutes 6
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Writing 9.5.6.1 Write coherently at text level using a variety of connectors on a growing range of familiar general and curricular topics 1 1 Open ended Writing a story Learners choose one of the topics and write a story on the topics «Music and Film» or «Traditions and Language» according to the given questions, connecting them into paragraphs and providing some examples and reasons to support idea, keeping appropriate structure of a given genre. 20 minutes 6
Speaking 9.3.7.1 Use appropriate subject-specific vocabulary and syntax to talk about an increased range of general and curricular topics 1 1 Open — ended Monologue Learners talk individually on the topics «Reading for pleasure», «Music and Film» and «Traditions and Language». Learners answer the questions on the given topic expressing their opinion, using stories from the previous learning or real life experience and applying a variety of grammar accurately and topical vocabulary. Learners should prepare for 1 minute and talk for 2-3 minutes. Teacher can ask supporting questions if necessary to help learners. 3-4 minutes 6
TOTAL: 40 minutes (excluding speaking) 24
Note: * — sections that can be changed
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Sample questions and mark scheme Tasks for the Summative Assessment for term 3 LISTENING
Task. Listen to five people talking about different celebrations. Match the halves of the sentences (1-4) with the opinions (A-F) to make true sentences. ONE argument is extra.
CD3 Tapescript3
1. According to Speaker 1 their band is the best as _____________________________________________ [1]
2. According to Speaker 2 you have to be careful because ________________________________________ [1]
3. According to Speaker 3 the picnic is going to be organised because ___________________________ [1]
4. According to Speaker 4 the birthday will be thematic as ______________________________________ [1]
5. According to Speaker 5 Royal wedding is the reason of [1]
A. it will fall at the end of autumn.
B. they have been playing for a long time together.
C. there are the thieves around.
D. having a celebration.
E. remembering people.
F. it’s going to be a family celebration.
Task. Choose and)orcTg)the correct answer A, B or C.
6. According to the speakers [1]
A. celebrations make people get tired
B. celebrations unite people together
C. people celebrate festivals with families
Total [6]
READING
WHAT’S A FILM WITHOUT POPCORN Popcorn has been associated with cinemas and films for as long as we can remember. But where did this connection begin and will it carry on into the future?
Popcorn became a popular snack food in North America in the 19th century and was sold at circuses and fairs. No kitchen was needed to prepare it and once the mobile steam owered popcorn maker was invented, it became possible to mass produce the snack. Popcorn had an appealing smell when popped and this attracted many people to buy it.
In the 1930s, people began flocking to the cinema but at first, popcorn was not sold inside the cinemas. Cinema owners wanted to protect the costly carpets that they had put in their cinemas. They were also concerned that the sound of people eating snacks would disturb the other people watching the film. So, enterprising salesmen set up popcorn machines outside the buildings. As lots of people began buying popcorn on their way into the cinema, cinema owners understood that they could make money from the popular snack. Thus, they decided to allow the salesmen to sell popcorn in the cinema lobby for a daily fee. Eventually, cinemas began selling snacks themselves. This decision helped save many of the cinema owners from going out of business.
Today, popcorn is still economically important to cinemas. Because popcorn is so cheap to make, cinemas make a lot of profits on every box they sell. Yet, there are those that suggest that popcorn in cinemas may be on its way out. In recent years, luxury cinemas have become increasingly popular. These cinemas try to give people a more “exclusive” experience by serving gourmet food in addition to traditional popcorn.
Yet despite this development, it is unlikely that popcorn will vanish completely from cinemas. For many of us, eating popcorn is an integral part of the experience of watching a film. Even when
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we watch a film on TV at home, we often make ourselves some microwave popcorn. Old habits, it seems, are hard to break!
Task. Paraphrase the given sentences so it has similar meaning. Use the given beginnings of sentences.
Example, No kitchen was needed to prepare popcorn.
Preparation___________________________________.
Answer, Preparation of popcorn did not need any kitchen.
1. Enterprising salesmen set up popcorn machines outside the building.
Popcorn machines____________________________________________________________. [1]
2. Selling snacks themselves helped save many of the cinema owners from going out of business. Many cinema . [ 1]
3. In recent years, luxury cinemas have become increasingly popular.
Popularity______________________________________________________________. [ 1]
4. When we watch a film on TV at home, we often make ourselves some microwave popcorn.
Home made_________________________________________________________________________________________. [ 1]
Task. Answer the questions.
5. Why have cinemas sold popcorn since the 19th century? [1]
6. Why cannot popcorn be dissapperead from cinemas? [1]
Total [6]
WRITING
Choose ONE of the topics and write.
Topic 1. You are a blogger who shares with own experience. Write a story about a concert you have been to.
Include the following information in your review:
• The concert; when? / where?
• The band: people in the band/ kind of music/ songs played
• The audience: how many people / their reaction
• Problems: the music/ the sound quality/ the time
• Suggestions: different place / different time / different kind of music
Write a story using linking words appropriately and paragraphing your story accurately.
Topic 2. You are a foreign journalist, recently visiting Kazakhstan. You would like to write a story about this country in your professional blog.
Include the following information in your story:
• People in Kazakhstan;
• Kazakh traditions (kyrkynan shygaru, shildekhana, tusau kesu, etc.);
• Traditional clothes (shapan, kamzol, saukele, takiya, etc.);
• Traditional food;
• Personal recommendation
Write a story using linking words appropriately and paragraphing your story accurately.
Total [6]
SPEAKING
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Task. You are given questions to speak about for 2-3 minutes. Before you speak you have one minute to think about what you are going to say.
Card 1
1. How often do you watch films?
2. What genre do you prefer?
3. What’s your favourite film?
4. How have films changed over the years?
Card 2
1. Do you like listening to music on a regular basis?
2. What kind of songs or music do you like listening to?
3. Where do you think people enjoy listening to music the most?
4. Do you think music is getting better as time goes on?
Card 3
1. What music do you enjoy listening to?
2. Where do people usually enjoy listening to music?
3. Is foreign music or music from your country more popular with people of your age? (Why do you think that is?)
4. What do you think the effect of more music in schools would be?
Card 4
1. How many languages do you speak?
2. Should people learn foreign languages? Why? Why not?
3. Do you think that all children should learn foreign languages at school?
4. Why do some people have more difficulties than others while learning a language?
Card 5
1. What national traditions do you know? Tell about one of them.
2. What kind of tradition around the world do you know?
3. Why are traditions important?
4. Are there any changes in modern and traditional lifestyles?
Card 6
1. What is the most famous tradition in your country?
2. What are Kazakh people famous for?
3. Should we keep our traditions in modern life?
4. What tradition would you like to pass on to the next generation?
Card 7
1. What language would you like to learn? Why?
2. What difficulties you think you might have when learning the language?
3. Why, in your opinion, do some people not progress in their language studies?
4. Do you think there is a danger that English could slowly replace your native language?
Card 8
1. How is modern Kazakh music different from traditional Kazakh music?
2. What influence do you think music has on life?
3. How does music change your mood?
4. What part does music play in your culture?
Total [6] Total marks /24
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Mark scheme Listening and Reading
Question № Answer Mark Additional information
Listening
1 B 1
2 C 1
3 F 1
4 A 1
5 D 1
6 B 1
Reading
1 Popcorn machines are set up outside the buildings by enterprising salesmen. 1
2 Many cinema owners saved their business by selling snacks themselves. 1 Accept any appropriate answer.
3 Popularity of luxury cinemas has being increased in recent years. 1
4 Home made popcorn is prepared while watching a film on TV at home. 1
5 It became a popular snack food. / More and more people began buying popcorn. 1 Answers may vary. Learners may write an answer using their own words but the idea must be
6 It is an integral part of the experience of watching a film. 1 the same as in the text.
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Mark scheme Writing and Speaking
CRITERIA FOR MARKING WRITING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (content, organisation, vocabulary, and grammar and punctuation), and then calculate a mean to give an overall ^ total out of 6. All fractional marks should be rounded up to the closest whole mark.______________________________________________________
Mark / Criterion Content (relevance and development of ideas Organisation (cohesion, paragraphing, and format) Vocabulary (style and accuracy) Grammar (style and accuracy) and Punctuation (accuracy)
6 • All content is relevant to the task. • The register completely corresponds to the requirements of the task; consistent and intentional misuse of register* may indicate a writer’s personal style. • All content points are fully addressed and developed in a balanced way. *Such misuse of register should not harm the format of writing. • Uses a wide range of connectors accurately; referencing is mostly clear. • Uses paragraphs to separate ideas; all paragraphs revolve around one idea or a set of like ideas; the size of each paragraph allows for a proper and balanced development of ideas. • The format is appropriate, but may be modified for a better reading experience. • Uses a range of everyday vocabulary appropriately; attempts to use less common lexical items with occasional inappropriacies. • Has good control of word formation; may make occasional errors in producing less common word forms. • Spells common vocabulary items correctly; very few (one or two) occasional spelling mistakes may be present. • May occasionally misspell less common lexical items. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling do not distort meaning. • Writes simple and compound sentence forms correctly and demonstrates some variety in length. • Attempts some complex sentences, but they tend to be less accurate, including punctuation. • Errors in grammar and/or punctuation do not distort meaning.
5 • All content is relevant to the task; insignificant content omissions may be present. • The register on the whole corresponds to the requirements of the task; occasional and inconsistent misuse of register may be present. • Uses a range of basic connectors accurately and attempts to use more advanced connectors, but not always accurately, and referencing, but not always clearly or appropriately. • Uses paragraphs to separate ideas; most paragraphs • Uses a range of everyday vocabulary appropriately; attempts to use less common lexical items, but may make frequent errors. • Has good control of word formation; may make errors in producing less common word forms. • Writes simple and compound sentence forms correctly, but does not demonstrate variety in length. • Occasional errors in grammar and/or punctuation do not distort meaning.
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• Most content points are addressed, but their development may be slightly imbalanced. revolve around one idea or a set of like ideas; the size of each paragraph may reflect imbalanced development of ideas. • The format is appropriate. • Spells common vocabulary items correctly; few (no more than five) occasional spelling mistakes may be present. • May often misspell less common lexical items. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling do not distort meaning.
4 • Most content is relevant to the task; insignificant content omissions may be present. • The register on the whole corresponds to the requirements of the task. • Most content points are addressed, but some content points may be more fully covered than others. • Uses a range of basic connectors accurately. • Uses paragraphs to separate ideas, but tends to misuse paragraphing (a script is a set of very short paragraphs or some paragraphs may be much longer than other ones for no apparent reason). • The format is generally appropriate. • Uses everyday vocabulary generally appropriately, while occasionally overusing certain lexical items. • Has good control of word formation; can produce common word forms correctly. • May make infrequent errors in spelling more difficult words. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling rarely distort meaning. • Writes simple and some compound sentence forms correctly. • While errors in grammar and/or punctuation are noticeable, meaning is rarely distorted.
3 • Some content is relevant to the task; significant content omissions may be present. • The register barely corresponds to the requirements of the task. • Only some content points, which are minimally addressed. • Uses some basic connectors, but these may be inaccurate or repetitive. • Writes in paragraphs, but may not use them to separate ideas (a script may have random breaks between paragraphs). • The format may be inappropriate in places. • Uses basic vocabulary reasonably appropriately. • Has some control of word formation; can produce some common word forms correctly. • Makes frequent errors in spelling more difficult words, but simple words are spelled correctly. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling distort meaning at • Writes simple sentence forms mostly correctly. • Errors in grammar and/or punctuation may distort meaning at times.
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times.
2 • Severe irrelevances and misinterpretations of the task may be present. • Only few content points, which are minimally addressed. • May use a very limited range of basic cohesive devices, and those used may not indicate a logical relationship between ideas. • Attempts to write in paragraphs, but their use may be confusing (may start every sentence with a new line). • The format may be inappropriate. • Uses an extremely limited range of vocabulary. • Has very limited control of word formation; can produce a few common word forms correctly. • Makes many errors in spelling, including a range of simple words. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling distort meaning. • Writes some simple sentence forms correctly. • Frequent errors in grammar and/or punctuation distort meaning.
1 • Attempts the task, but it is largely misinterpreted and the response is barely relevant to the task. • Links are missing or incorrect. • Does not write in paragraphs at all (a script is a block of text). • The format is not appropriate. • Can only use a few isolated words and/or memorised phrases. • Has essentially no control of word formation; can barely produce any word forms. • Displays few examples of conventional spelling. • No evidence of sentence forms.
0 • Does not attempt the task in any way. OR • The response is completely irrelevant to the task. OR • There is too little language to assess. OR • Content is completely incomprehensible due to extremely poor handwriting: very few words are distinguishable, so there is a lack of context to verify meaning.
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CRITERIA FOR MARKING SPEAKING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (development and fluency, and language), and then calculate a mean to give an overall total out of 6.
Mark / Criterion Development and Fluency Language
6 • Produces stretches of language in a register which is appropriate to the situation provided in the task and may opt to vary register to enhance meaning. • Shows sustained ability to maintain a conversation and to make relevant contributions at some length. • Produces extended stretches of language despite some hesitation. • Can respond to change in direction of the conversation. • Pronunciation is intelligible*. • Intonation is appropriate. • Produces error-free simple sentences. • Attempts some complex grammatical forms, but may make errors, which rarely cause comprehension problems. • Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary to give and exchange views on a growing range of general and curricular topics.
5 • Produces stretches of language in a register which is appropriate to the situation provided in the task. • Responds relevantly and at length which makes frequent prompting unnecessary, resulting in a competent conversation. • Produces mostly extended stretches of language despite some hesitation, although instances of using short phrases may be present. • Can generally respond to change in direction of the conversation. • Pronunciation is generally intelligible. • Intonation is generally appropriate • Produces error-free simple sentences. • Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary when talking about a range of general and curricular topics. • Occasional mistakes do not cause comprehension problems.
4 • Produces stretches of language in a register which is generally appropriate to the situation provided in the task. • Attempts to respond to questions and prompts. • Produces responses which are extended beyond short phrases, despite hesitation. • Effort will need to be made to develop the conversation; only partial success will be achieved. • Pronunciation is mostly intelligible. • May not follow English intonation patterns at times. • Frequently produces error-free simple sentences. • Uses appropriate vocabulary to talk about a limited range of general and curricular topics. • Errors may cause comprehension problems.
3 • Produces stretches of language without awareness of register. • Produces basic sentence forms and some correct simple
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• Responses tend to be brief and are characterised by frequent hesitation. • Has to be encouraged to go beyond short responses and struggles to develop a conversation. • There is a lack of intelligibility of pronunciation, but it is unlikely to impede communication. • May not follow English intonation patterns frequently. sentences. • Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a limited range of general topics. • Errors are frequent and may lead to misunderstanding.
2 • Responses are so brief that little is communicated. • Barely engages in a conversation. • Pronunciation may cause some communication difficulty. • Does not follow English intonation patterns. • Attempts basic sentence forms, but with limited success. OR • Heavily relies on apparently memorised utterances. • Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a very limited range of general topics. • Makes numerous errors except in memorised expressions.
1 • No communication possible. • Pronunciation and intonation patterns cause difficulty for even the most sympathetic listener. • Cannot produce basic sentence forms. • Can only produce isolated words and phrases or memorised utterances.
0 • No attempt at the response. OR • No rateable language.
*Speech deficiencies should not be considered as affecting intelligibility.
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Transcript
A
It was Nicky’s idea, but we all think it’s going to be brilliant. As soon as the last exams have finished, we’re going to decorate the main hall at school with paper streamers and Chinese lanterns and things. Steve had this idea of projecting photos of everyone onto a wall, like a slide show. And we’ve got Jo’s brother, who’s a professional DJ, coming along. Then there are three different bands lined up to play. Ours is the best, because we’ve been together longest and we’ve got a great bass player, (coughs) although I say so myself, so we’re on last. It’s going to be cool.
B
Every year there’s a carnival in August in London. You’ve probably heard of it, the Notting Hill Carnival? So this year, me and my friends are going again. We went last year and we had such a fantastic time. It’s all Afro-Caribbean, with people in amazing costumes and these brilliant steel bands. We don’t go in costume, but we do dance a lot. It does get quite crowded, so you have to make sure you stick together. And you have to watch out for pick-pockets when there are so many people in the same place. But it’s really good fun; it’s like London becomes a different country. Even the police dance sometimes.
C
We’re going to hire a boat for the day and take it up the river. It’s my grandparents’ golden wedding anniversary, so the whole family is getting together. I’m really looking forward to seeing my cousins again. I haven’t seen them for ages. We’ve got this huge picnic planned, with loads of different types of sandwiches and salads and an enormous cake. My dad has borrowed an ancient gramophone player, you know, what they had before CD players, and some old records. So as we go up the river we’re going to listen to music from the time my grandparents got married — the swinging sixties!
D
Two of my best friends have their birthday in the same week, so some of us have decided to have a surprise party for both of them. One of my friends, Sandra, has a big house, and her parents say we can use it. They’re going away, luckily. It’s at the end of October, so we’re going to decorate the house with Halloween things, you know, spiders’ webs and spooky things. We’re going to make up an excuse to get the birthday girls to come round to the house — say we’re going to help Sandra move some stuff, or something. Then, as soon as Sandra lets them in, we’re going to turn the lights out and jump out at them! We just have to make sure nobody mentions anything on Facebook and gives away the surprise.
E
There’s a Royal Wedding in June — one of our princes is getting married — so it’s a public holiday. Lots of people are having parties in squares and parks and places, and the people in our street decided to have one too. Well, it’s a good excuse to have a party, isn’t it? We’re all going to take out tables and chairs and put them together in the middle of the road. We’re going to stop cars coming through, obviously. We’re all going to bring different dishes and share them round. There are quite a lot of different nationalities living on our street — people from India, China and different African countries — so the food should be really interesting. It’ll be good to get to know more of the neighbours too.
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SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 4
Review of summative assessment for term 4 Duration of the summative assessment — 40 minutes
Listening — 10 minutes
Reading — 10 minutes
Writing — 20 minutes
Speaking task is conducted separately.
Total marks — 24
The structure of the summative assessment
This sample of Summative Assessment consists of 14 questions: listening, reading, writing and speaking. Different types of tasks are used in the Summative Assessment for term.
Listening — multiple-choice and sentence correction task the topic «Travel and Tourism».
Reading — matching task on the topic «Science and Technology».
Writing — writing an essay on the topics «Travel and Tourism» and «Science and Technology».
Speaking — making a monologue on the topics «Travel and Tourism» and «Science and Technology».
Tapescript for listening task can be found in CD3. Transcript can be found after the mark scheme.
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Characteristic of tasks for summative assessment for term 4
Unit Strand Learning objective *Total number of questions *Question № *Type of question *Task description Time Total marks
Travel and Tourism Science and Technology Listening 9.2.3.1 Understand most of the detail of an argument in unsupported extended talk on a wide range of general and curricular topics 9.2.6.1 Deduce meaning from context in unsupported extended talk on a wide range of general and curricular topics 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 Multiple- choice Sentence correction Task 1- Learners listen to an extended talk on the topic «Travel and Tourism». Learners listen to the recording and choose two opinions which are appropriate according to the recording. The task enables learners to identify the speaker’s opinion.. Learners listen to an extended talk on the topic “Travel and Tourism”. Task 2 — Learners listen to the recording and replace the underlined words with their synonyms with the correct spelling. The task enables learners to identify meaning of the words. Learners should listen to the recording twice, having chance to look through the questions before the recording starts. 10 minutes 6
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Reading 9.4.5.1 Deduce meaning from context in extended texts on a range of familiar general and curricular topics 9.4.7.1 Recognise typical features at word, sentence and text level in a wide range of written genres 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 Matching Learners read an extended text on the topic «Science and Technology». Task 1 requires identifying the meaning of the words from the context . Learners should circle the word that can replace the underlined word in the text without changing the meaning Task 2 is matching paragraphs to the topic sentences. Learners should be able to recognise typical features at text level. 10 minutes 6
Writing 9.5.7.1 Use independently appropriate layout at text level on a growing range of general and curricular topics 9.5.8.1 Spell most high-frequency vocabulary accurately for a wide range of familiar general and curricular topics 1 1 Open ended Writing an essay Learners write an essay. Learners should write an essay according to the given questions, keeping the layout and format of a given genre, using punctuation marks correctly, demonstrating the ability to use future forms. Learners write an essay following the given topic. Learners should choose one task on the topics «Travel and Tourism» and «Science and Technology». 20 minutes 6
Speaking 9.3.8.1 Recount extended stories and events on a range of general and curricular topics 1 1 Open -ended Monologue Learners talk on the topics «Travel and Tourism» and «Science and Technology». Learners choose a card and speak on the given questions providing examples from life experience 2-3 minutes 6
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9.6.8.1 Use a variety of future forms, including some passives, on a range of familiar general and curricular topics and demonstrating the ability to use active and passive forms of the verbs. Learners should prepare for 1 minute and talk 2-3 minutes. Teacher can ask supporting questions if necessary to help learners.
TOTAL: 40 minutes (excluding speaking) 24
Note: * — sections that can be changed
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Sample questions and mark scheme Tasks for the Summative Assessment for term 4
LISTENING
Task. Listen to two people talking about why they visited or moved to a particular place. Match the sentences (1-2) with their opinion (A — D). There are TWO extra options.
CD3 Tapescript4
1. According to Speaker 1 the only thing he could not do was … [1]
2. Speaker 2 was a bit nervous because she had to … [1]
A. being at the wedding party.
B. move to a different city on her own.
C. seeing a kangaroo in the wild.
D. go out of the town to get inspiration.
Task. Listen to the Speaker 3. Replace the underlined words in the sentences 1-3 with the words
from the recording. Write ONE WORD ONLY for each case. Use the correct part of speech.
CD3 Tapescript 5
3. The professor Harold Johns was a popular person. _________________[ 1]
4. The man wanted to persuade the Professor to allow him as his team-member.___________________[1]
5. The professor was surprised by his resume. [1]
6. The man was very thankful for this chance [1]
Total [6]
READING
MODERN TECHNOLOGY
A. Modern technology is changing the way we live our lives. Clever gadgets make everyday activities easier and enable people to use their time effectively. But what impact will this change have in the future and is it really a positive thing? People are busier than ever before.
B. Technological advances (0) mean that things are often possible with the touch of a button. A hundred years ago, however, things were very different. Everyday jobs, like doing the laundry, would take a whole day, and the telephone was a new invention! Nowadays, almost every household has a washing machine and a dishwasher, and there are more than 70 million mobile phones in use in the United Kingdom alone.
C. Research shows that around 28% of children in the UK are obese. Some people are concerned that this is because young people (1) spend too much time online and not enough time socialising with their friends and playing outside. In the past, nearly all children walked to school because their parents didn’t have a car. They didn’t have all the luxuries that many children have now, so they used their imaginations and played outdoors in the fresh air.
D. Years ago, when people wanted to stay in touch with their friends and family, they wrote letters. These days, however, E-mail communication and social networking sites, such as Facebook, allow (2) instant, free international communication.
E. There are many benefits of using technology but we need to be responsible in the choices we make. Modern equipment is often very expensive and does not (3) last a long time. It is important to consider how much we really need these things and the impact they have on our health, the environment and society.
(Facts sourced from http://www.dh.gov.uk)
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Task. Read the text and circle the word that can replace the underlined word in the text without changing the meaning.
Example: (0) average greedy (Indicate) way
1. empty give pay waste [1]
2. current immediate present soluble [1]
3. continue final past spread [1]
Task. Match paragraphs A — E to the topic sentences below.
4. Our responsibility when choosing to use modern technology. [1]
5. The impact of modern technology on everyday life over the past century. ______________________ [1]
6. The effect of modern technology on young people. [1]
Total [6] WRITING Choose ONE of the topics and write an essay.
Topic 1. Travelling has become popular in recent years. What are the advantages and disadvantages of travelling?
Topic 2. Technologies are changing the way we live. What are the advantages and disadvantages of advanced technologies?
Total [6] SPEAKING
Task. You are given a card with a topic and questions to speak about for 2-3 minutes. Before you
speak you have one minute to think about what you are going to say and you can make notes if you
wish.
Card 1 — «Travel and Tourism»
1. Which countries would you like to visit? Why?
2. How can you experience culture when visiting a place?
3. Do you think you can truly understand a place and its people by visiting the tourist attractions? Why? / Why not?
4. Will it be possible to travel to other planets in the future?
Card 2 — «Travel and Tourism»
1. Where did you spend your last vacation? What did you do?
2. What’s the best way to travel? (by air, sea, rail, etc.)?
3. What are some advantages and disadvantages of travelling by ship?
4. What do you think how people will travel in the future?
Card 3 — «Travel and Tourism»
1. How important is tourism in your country?
2. What is the biggest tourist destination in your country?
3. What are the benefits of international tourism?
4. Are there any drawbacks of international tourism?
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Card 4 — «Science and Technology»
1. Do you think that there is life on other planets? Explain.
2. Why do people explore space?
3. What is the current situation of space exploration in your country?
4. In your opinion, should money be spent on space exploration?
Card 5 — «Science and Technology»
1. Do you enjoy using technology? Why? Why not?
2. What is your favorite gadget? Why?
3. How does technology affect our everyday life?
4. In your opinion what changes might happen in the future with technology?
Card 6 — «Travel and Tourism»
1. What are the three most famous natural wonders in your country?
2. What natural wonders are in danger from climate change?
3. Should people be allowed to visit a natural wonder if the visitors hurt the natural wonder just by visiting it?
4. Would you rather visit natural wonders or manmade wonders?
Card 7 — «Science and Technology»
1. Do you enjoy using technology?
2. What kind of technological developments have made the biggest impact on our lives?
3. Do computers make it much easier to study?
4. Do you think that the rate of technological expansion will slow down in the future?
Card 8 — «Science and Technology»
1. How often do you take medicine?
2. How has medicine changed in the past hundred years?
3. How different would the world be without medicine?
4. What do you think the next revolution in medicine will be?
Total [6] Total marks /24
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tii
т
2
3
4
5
6
т
2
3
4
5
6
Mark scheme Listening and Reading
Answer
Mark
Additional information
Listening
C
B
Famous
Convince
Impressed
Grateful
A learner gets a point if there are no spelling mistakes
Reading
waste
immediate
continue
E
B
C
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Mark scheme Writing and Speaking
CRITERIA FOR MARKING WRITING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (content, organisation, vocabulary, and grammar and punctuation), and then calculate a mean to give an overall ^ total out of 6. All fractional marks should be rounded up to the closest whole mark.______________________________________________________
Mark / Criterion Content (relevance and development of ideas Organisation (cohesion, paragraphing, and format) Vocabulary (style and accuracy) Grammar (style and accuracy) and Punctuation (accuracy)
6 • All content is relevant to the task. • The register completely corresponds to the requirements of the task; consistent and intentional misuse of register* may indicate a writer’s personal style. • All content points are fully addressed and developed in a balanced way. *Such misuse of register should not harm the format of writing. • Uses a wide range of connectors accurately; referencing is mostly clear. • Uses paragraphs to separate ideas; all paragraphs revolve around one idea or a set of like ideas; the size of each paragraph allows for a proper and balanced development of ideas. • The format is appropriate, but may be modified for a better reading experience. • Uses a range of everyday vocabulary appropriately; attempts to use less common lexical items with occasional inappropriacies. • Has good control of word formation; may make occasional errors in producing less common word forms. • Spells common vocabulary items correctly; very few (one or two) occasional spelling mistakes may be present. • May occasionally misspell less common lexical items. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling do not distort meaning. • Writes simple and compound sentence forms correctly and demonstrates some variety in length. • Attempts some complex sentences, but they tend to be less accurate, including punctuation. • Errors in grammar and/or punctuation do not distort meaning.
5 • All content is relevant to the task; insignificant content omissions may be present. • The register on the whole corresponds to the requirements of the task; occasional and inconsistent misuse of register may be present. • Uses a range of basic connectors accurately and attempts to use more advanced connectors, but not always accurately, and referencing, but not always clearly or appropriately. • Uses paragraphs to separate ideas; most paragraphs • Uses a range of everyday vocabulary appropriately; attempts to use less common lexical items, but may make frequent errors. • Has good control of word formation; may make errors in producing less common word forms. • Writes simple and compound sentence forms correctly, but does not demonstrate variety in length. • Occasional errors in grammar and/or punctuation do not distort meaning.
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• Most content points are addressed, but their development may be slightly imbalanced. revolve around one idea or a set of like ideas; the size of each paragraph may reflect imbalanced development of ideas. • The format is appropriate. • Spells common vocabulary items correctly; few (no more than five) occasional spelling mistakes may be present. • May often misspell less common lexical items. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling do not distort meaning.
4 • Most content is relevant to the task; insignificant content omissions may be present. • The register on the whole corresponds to the requirements of the task. • Most content points are addressed, but some content points may be more fully covered than others. • Uses a range of basic connectors accurately. • Uses paragraphs to separate ideas, but tends to misuse paragraphing (a script is a set of very short paragraphs or some paragraphs may be much longer than other ones for no apparent reason). • The format is generally appropriate. • Uses everyday vocabulary generally appropriately, while occasionally overusing certain lexical items. • Has good control of word formation; can produce common word forms correctly. • May make infrequent errors in spelling more difficult words. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling rarely distort meaning. • Writes simple and some compound sentence forms correctly. • While errors in grammar and/or punctuation are noticeable, meaning is rarely distorted.
3 • Some content is relevant to the task; significant content omissions may be present. • The register barely corresponds to the requirements of the task. • Only some content points, which are minimally addressed. • Uses some basic connectors, but these may be inaccurate or repetitive. • Writes in paragraphs, but may not use them to separate ideas (a script may have random breaks between paragraphs). • The format may be inappropriate in places. • Uses basic vocabulary reasonably appropriately. • Has some control of word formation; can produce some common word forms correctly. • Makes frequent errors in spelling more difficult words, but simple words are spelled correctly. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling distort meaning at • Writes simple sentence forms mostly correctly. • Errors in grammar and/or punctuation may distort meaning at times.
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times.
2 • Severe irrelevances and misinterpretations of the task may be present. • Only few content points, which are minimally addressed. • May use a very limited range of basic cohesive devices, and those used may not indicate a logical relationship between ideas. • Attempts to write in paragraphs, but their use may be confusing (may start every sentence with a new line). • The format may be inappropriate. • Uses an extremely limited range of vocabulary. • Has very limited control of word formation; can produce a few common word forms correctly. • Makes many errors in spelling, including a range of simple words. • Errors in word choice and/or spelling distort meaning. • Writes some simple sentence forms correctly. • Frequent errors in grammar and/or punctuation distort meaning.
1 • Attempts the task, but it is largely misinterpreted and the response is barely relevant to the task. • Links are missing or incorrect. • Does not write in paragraphs at all (a script is a block of text). • The format is not appropriate. • Can only use a few isolated words and/or memorised phrases. • Has essentially no control of word formation; can barely produce any word forms. • Displays few examples of conventional spelling. • No evidence of sentence forms.
0 • Does not attempt the task in any way. OR • The response is completely irrelevant to the task. OR • There is too little language to assess. OR • Content is completely incomprehensible due to extremely poor handwriting: very few words are distinguishable, so there is a lack of context to verify meaning.
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CRITERIA FOR MARKING SPEAKING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (development and fluency, and language), and then calculate a mean to give an overall total out of 6.
Mark / Criterion Development and Fluency Language
6 • Produces stretches of language in a register which is appropriate to the situation provided in the task and may opt to vary register to enhance meaning. • Shows sustained ability to maintain a conversation and to make relevant contributions at some length. • Produces extended stretches of language despite some hesitation. • Can respond to change in direction of the conversation. • Pronunciation is intelligible*. • Intonation is appropriate. • Produces error-free simple sentences. • Attempts some complex grammatical forms, but may make errors, which rarely cause comprehension problems. • Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary to give and exchange views on a growing range of general and curricular topics.
5 • Produces stretches of language in a register which is appropriate to the situation provided in the task. • Responds relevantly and at length which makes frequent prompting unnecessary, resulting in a competent conversation. • Produces mostly extended stretches of language despite some hesitation, although instances of using short phrases may be present. • Can generally respond to change in direction of the conversation. • Pronunciation is generally intelligible. • Intonation is generally appropriate • Produces error-free simple sentences. • Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary when talking about a range of general and curricular topics. • Occasional mistakes do not cause comprehension problems.
4 • Produces stretches of language in a register which is generally appropriate to the situation provided in the task. • Attempts to respond to questions and prompts. • Produces responses which are extended beyond short phrases, despite hesitation. • Effort will need to be made to develop the conversation; only partial success will be achieved. • Pronunciation is mostly intelligible. • May not follow English intonation patterns at times. • Frequently produces error-free simple sentences. • Uses appropriate vocabulary to talk about a limited range of general and curricular topics. • Errors may cause comprehension problems.
3 • Produces stretches of language without awareness of register. • Produces basic sentence forms and some correct simple
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• Responses tend to be brief and are characterised by frequent hesitation. • Has to be encouraged to go beyond short responses and struggles to develop a conversation. • There is a lack of intelligibility of pronunciation, but it is unlikely to impede communication. • May not follow English intonation patterns frequently. sentences. • Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a limited range of general topics. • Errors are frequent and may lead to misunderstanding.
2 • Responses are so brief that little is communicated. • Barely engages in a conversation. • Pronunciation may cause some communication difficulty. • Does not follow English intonation patterns. • Attempts basic sentence forms, but with limited success. OR • Heavily relies on apparently memorised utterances. • Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a very limited range of general topics. • Makes numerous errors except in memorised expressions.
1 • No communication possible. • Pronunciation and intonation patterns cause difficulty for even the most sympathetic listener. • Cannot produce basic sentence forms. • Can only produce isolated words and phrases or memorised utterances.
0 • No attempt at the response. OR • No rateable language.
*Speech deficiencies should not be considered as affecting intelligibility
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Transcript
Speaker 1 I’d always wanted to visit Australia and when my friend Sarah who lives in Sydney invited me to her wedding, I accepted the invitation immediately. I arrived in Sydney about a week before the wedding and spend as much time as possible taking in the sights. The Sydney Opera House was one of the highlights of my trip. I went on a guided tour of the various Theatres and I watched a musical. I also went to the Sydney Aquarium as a glass chamber in the aquarium that allows visitors to get a close. Look at some incredible sea creatures including sharks. All in all my holiday was wonderful and I really enjoyed Sarah’s wedding. My only regret is that I never got to see a kangaroo.
Speaker 2 When I received a letter informing me that I’d been accepted into the College of dramatic arts in New York City. I was absolutely thrilled still as excited. As I was I was also a little nervous about leaving home and moving to a new place or by myself. My first day in New York was overwhelming. It’s a fast-paced city and it can be quite a challenge keeping up. It took me a few months to settle in and there were times when I felt quite homesick now, I am thoroughly enjoying my studies and I’ve just been chosen for the lead role in a play that’s being produced at the college. Who knows maybe one day you’ll see me performing in a play on Broadway now wouldn’t that be something?
Speaker 3 I’ve been working as an archaeologist for about a year when I heard that Professor Harold Jones a world famous scientist was putting together a team of experts to help him search for a lost city in Mexico. It had always been my dream to work with Professor Jones. So I immediately handed in my resignation and booked a ticket to Mexico.
My plan was to convince the professor to let me be part of his team. Even though I wasn’t very experienced. Luckily. The professor was quite impressed with my CV and decided to give me a job. I’ve been in Mexico for six months now. It’s been a wonderful learning experience for me, and I’m really grateful for the opportunity.
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